Contemplative photography . Finding moments of grace today.

Some moments of grace found on my walk today from Dolphin Court to Tuggerah Lake.

one of lightness of being and joy with a ‘feathered angel ‘  in my view and a later

in the week along Tuggerah Lake a new moment of grace. –one of beauty in light but darkness gathering.

The evening Eyeku of mine .

Remembering we are both  parched and quenched  by the illumining light  reminds us joy and sadness are both the flip side of each other.

I like Kahlil Gibran’s  words from The Prophet:

“Your joy is  your sorrow unmasked.
And the self-same well from which your laughter
rises was oftentimes filled with your tears. . .
Some of you say, ‘Joy is greater than sorrow’, and others say, ‘Nay, sorrow is the greater’
But I say unto you, they are inseparable.
Together they come, and when one sits alone with you at your board, remember that the other is asleep upon your bed.”

 

 

Walking Quiet Ways No. 3 Central Coast by Colleen Keating

Early Tentative Steps out of Lockdown

Dolphin House to Long Jetty 

Set out before lunch to walk to Long Jetty and meet Michael  for a picnic lunch.

The day was a stunning blue winters day with some gorgeous fluffy happy clouds bouncing around and giving wonderful ware reflections  as you will see in some of the photos. . I walked along the beach till it became the lake, under the bridge, past the old boat shed, along the path of huge Norfolf pines where the cormorants nest,  along past The Lake House around the bend to the south side of Tuggerah Lake. I met a couple looking very concerned taking photos of fishing lines and tackle caught up in the pines. I firstly smiled thinking of the frustration of your line getting caught like when a kite gets caught  and then herd the story of how ignorant  The Pelicans were standing there confused as picnickers were taking their place everywhere .

Only a few days back the birds had the place to themselves.

I walked along the edge of the lake enjoying the  glass waters reflection of the fluffy clouds  and as usual i enjoyed the birds   the pelicans , ibis, two gorgeous black swans

a wonderful reflection of a large white egret feeding amonst the reeds, a couple of masked lapwings or plovers as we call them

 

I kept walking past the jetty as it was a bit busy and not enough room for social distancing and found a perfect spot a little further on. Michael and I met with the app ‘ Find a friend ‘ very modern of us haha . He pulled up where i had found a view and a table and was writing and he arrived with thermos for tea and coffee and a picnic lunch.

We actually drove on after that to look at heaters and a back up charger. We bought unsuccessfully as the heater doesn’t blow out air and the charger doesn’t fit,  so Monday a return day. and we might do the same walk and picnic lunch .

Just want to add some photos that I took on our return a few hours later. Here the sunsetting over the lake  is breathtaking.

 

 

Summer walk: The Poetry of Tuggerah Lake

The Poetry of Tuggerah Lake

 

 

Our walk begins on the beach,
low tide and the sea gulls
strutting on the edge,
a flotilla of pelicans glide
with the incoming tide.
A cormorant dives over and over
no chance of predicting where he’d surface.

Coffee from the barrister
at The Lake House is worth the anticipation
(no milk at the apartment so we were hanging out.) 

Two fisherman gut their catch at the sink- bench
and pelicans line up for their share of the feed.

Corellas paired up and sing  preening each other
some on the grass, some in the trees
near an awkward looking ibis pretending
to look elegant on a branch
where cormorants play notes
on musical staves

and on the lake
black swans silky as ballerinas
flaunt with their reflections
on the shiny mirrored lake.

Lap wings were out
squawking to claim their territory.
The council has fenced off
the sand dune to protect
nests of the Little Terns
who migrate from China for the summer
and we watch their acrobatics
around the dunes and seaweed.

 

The sandstone rocks glint
with their striations and swivels and colour
showing us more than any history
or geology text book could

Our signature spoonbill
we expect to see, is again there
as we cross the bridge near the lake,
with his caravan of ducks and hangers-on
waiting for him to disturb the mudflat.

The morning lake catches
the clouds, the sky and ever changing light
and on our way back as the tide turns
the sea spray against the rocks
sings alleluia to another day. 

darginyung 1st poem in A Call to Listen

calltolisten

 

This is  the beginning poems in my Poetry collection. It refers to the traditional language of the first peoples and recognises them as first inhabitants of the area around The Entrance, Tuggerah Lakes where many of my poem are set. (Sometimes spelt darginjung)

darginyung

welcome to country drones
the didgeridoo its spirit
circles the hollowed wood

sings the darkness into dawn
and in its dancing rhythm
the dreaming drifts in